Common Core State Standards Resources



Resources for Reading Informational Text
Resources for Reading Literary Text
Resources for Speaking & Listening


Instructional Mapping Tools for Common Core State Standards Implementation

Common Core State Standards Progression- Interactive Tool from NC DPI
http://rt3nc.org/objects/standards/cclitmap/ela.html


Common Core State Standards Bookmarks (Tulare County, CA)- achor standard, specific standard, essential skills and concepts, question stems and promts, academic vocabulary, Spanish cognates
Grades 9-10

Grades 11-12

Common Core State Standards Progression- Grades 6-12

Extended resources and planning template for each standard- (amazing!)
Grades 9-10

Grades 11-12




by Standard

Open Ended Questions for Discussion or Constructed Response






Ready EOC Question Stems by Standard







RI.9-10.6 Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose.


Sentence Frames- This resource is useful for scaffolding student written and oral responses to questions about a text. The sentence frames are categorized by the relationships between/among key details in the sentences and include additional transistion words/phrases for each category. BONUS* These sentence frames are a great way to help LEP/ESL students internalize the patterns in oral and written English communication.



Argument Framing & Analysis- This resource is useful for breaking down an argument that students are reading. There is scaffolding built in for organization, transitions, types of claims annd evidence used. BONUS* This same resource can be used to scaffold writing an argument.



Show me/So what?- This resource is useful for helping students breakdown a piece of writing into its key elements and form ideas about the importance of each element. BONUS*** This same resource can be used to scaffold writing an argument.


Rhetorical Breakdown Activities- This group of 10 activities is useful for helping teachers and students focus on certain aspects of rhetoric with short excerpts from complex texts. Each activity includes a task and a text excerpt tailored to facilitate deep thought and possible discussion on related rhetorical ideas/concepts. Although these activities include complex texts and very high level questions, their narrow focus facilitates their use with all levels of students if scaffolded and structured accordingly.

2013 State of the Union Address- This document provides a side by side look at two versions of the 2013 State of the Union Address- as written and ad delivered. This document is useful for helping students recognize and analyze subtle differences between written and spoken rhetoric. Teachers may use the Show Me/ So What? graphic organizer to help students analyze the entire text or excepts from it.

2013 State of the Union Address- The following links can help teachers scaffold student access to the 2013 State of the Union Address through two different videos of entire speech.

http://www.whitehouse.gov/state-of-the-union-2013 This is the enhanced version of the 2013 State of the Union Address available on official website of the White House. It shows high quality video of the address pairs with full color supporting visual aids and graphics.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CKwE2EGsfMk This is a version of the 2013 State of the Union Address from beginning to end, without the entrance and exit "fan fare."



RI.9-10.7 Analyze various accounts of a subject told in different mediums (e.g., a person's life story in both print and multimedia), determining which details are emphasized in each account.


Sentence Frames- This resource is useful for helping students focus on what kinds of relationships they discover between and and among textx from different mediums. Teachers can provide a high level of scaffolding by selecting certain categories of sentence frames or even individual sentence frames from those categories for students. Teachers can increase the rigor by allowing students to only use the transitions provided for each category, not the actual sentence frames.




Show me/ So what? with SOAPStone- This resource is useful for helping students breakdown a piece of writing into the key elements of SOAPStone and form ideas about the importance of each element. BONUS*** This same resource can be used to scaffold writing an argument.



2013 State of the Union Address- The document provides a side by side look at two versions of the 2013 State of the Union Address- as written and ad delivered. This document, when paired with a full viewing of the address, is useful for helping students recognize and analyze subtle differences between written and spoken rhetoric. Teachers may use the Show Me/ So What? graphic organizer to help students analyze the written text and the video of its delivery.



2013 State of the Union Address- The following links can help teachers scaffold student access to the 2013 State of the Union Address through two different videos of entire speech. Teachers can use various categories of sentence frames (link above) to scaffold and structure student analysis of and responses to the written and video versions of the address.


http://www.whitehouse.gov/state-of-the-union-2013 This is the enhanced version of the 2013 State of the Union Address available on official website of the White House. It shows high quality video of the address pairs with full color supporting visual aids and graphics.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CKwE2EGsfMk This is a version of the 2013 State of the Union Address from beginning to end, without the entrance and exit "fan fare."






RI.9-10.8 Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.


Dirty Dozen- This resources lists and defines twelve common fallacies encountered in argumentation.


Understanding Arugument & Fun with Fallacies Lesson Plan- This lesson will reinforce the definitions of rhetoric and argument while introducing the idea of fallacies. Students will compete to find examples of fallacy in written argument before working independently to discover the mode of the author’s argument, his or her claims and use of evidence, and his or her use of fallacy (if present).
Activity 2 focuses on fallacies.


The Fallacy Files- This website is dedicated to teaching about fallacies. The link below takes the user to a page on the site called, "Stalking the Wild Fallacy." This page has many examples of different kinds of fallacies found in the "natural habitat of argumentation," and the user can click on a link to take them to a page that descirbes the kind of fallacy exemplified in each example.
Other links can be explored on the site to discover more about fallacies. http://www.fallacyfiles.org/examples.html


2013 State of the Union Address FACT CHECKING-
The links below offer several organizations versions of fact checking for the 2013 State fo the Union Address
Fox News:
http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2013/02/13/fact-check-on-obama-state-union-address/

PolitiFact:
http://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/article/2013/feb/12/fact-checking-state-union/

Washingotn Post (blog)- The Fact Checker- The Truth Behind the Rhetoric
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/fact-checker/post/fact-checking-the-2013-state-of-the-union-speech/2013/02/12/ce69a4e0-7589-11e2-95e4-6148e45d7adb_blog.html





RL.9-10.9 Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work (e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from Ovid or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare).


Comparative Literature: Theory, Method, Application- This resource is an online version of a Comparative Literature textbook. It provides several structures for conducting comparative literature analysis along with some detailed information about specific areas within the comparative literature field.
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Romeo & Juliet Comparative Study- This resource is a youtube playlist of scenes and music from different versions of Romeo & Juliet that can be used for a wide variety of classroom activities featuring the graphic organizers and tools provided above. Romeo & Juliet Comparative Study


Webinar video with CCSS co-author David Coleman click here

Common Core Video Series with David Coleman click here

EngageNY Common Core resource page- Great information and curriculum exemplars for all levels click here

CCSS authors' criteria for selecting materials and questions/tasks (intended for publishers- but very useful for teachers) click here